Environmental Sustainability

TRWD Illustration

TRWD is proactive in sustaining our existing natural resources.

Education and Outreach Programs

TRWD supports education as a means to develop and support a well‐informed community for watershed and resource protection. We are actively engaged in preserving the use of our water supply, promoting the health of lakes and rivers in our community, and even building and maintaining habitats for important native species. As an industry leader in sustainability, it is our social responsibility to work with environmental partners and educate the public on ways to contribute.

Get EducatedGet Educated

As an industry leader in sustainability, it is our social responsibility to work with environmental partners and educate the public on ways to contribute.

From parks to pipelines, we incorporate environmental stewardship, conservation, and sustainability into all of our practices and processes.

“Sustainability is a mindset. It’s who we are and how we approach projects and operations. It’s about doing the right projects and doing them the right way considering life-cycle costs, the communities we serve, and the environment.”

Rachel IckertWater Resources Engineering Director

Conserving Energy, Habitats and Water

Our projects preserve wildlife and pollinator habitats so they are around for future North Texans to enjoy.

The district has built Eagle Mountain Park, Airfield Falls Trailhead & Conservation Park and the George W. Shannon Wetlands. And yes, protecting our water supply is still extremely important. Despite the rapid growth in North Texas, TRWD’s water demands have not grown at the same pace over the last several years. The district’s water conservation efforts are helping save an average of 100 million gallons per day.

Educational outreach efforts with our customers and regional partners are helping to change behaviors and create a sustainable future in North Texas. Learn more about our water conservation programs.

Water Quality

For decades, TRWD has monitored water quality in our lakes and in the Trinity River, both of which are sources of drinking water and popular recreation destinations. We also actively look for ways to improve water quality and protect our watersheds through stormwater management, education, land management practices, and scientific research.

Water Monitoring | TRWD

Monitoring

Keeping tabs on water quality is important, and we do so through an established program that allows us to track the health of our reservoirs overtime. We’ve been monitoring our system for almost 30 years. The Trinity River and seven North Texas lakes are sampled continuously at multiple sites for various parameters, providing valuable information that can help lower treatment costs for our customers and keep our lakes and rivers thriving for wildlife and recreational uses.

Lake SamplingLake Sampling Trinity River Monitoring ProgramTrinity River Monitoring Program

Learn More About Our Lake Monitoring Program

Modeling

To study TRWD lakes, the district utilizes a the WASP model developed by the EPA. Models like this one are used to better understand our complex water systems and help manage them into the future.

Currently, the district is working to develop two additional models for the Trinity River that will simulate river flow and erosion impacts on the river as well as other parameters.

Modeling | TRWD

Modeling

To study TRWD lakes, the district utilizes a the WASP model developed by the EPA. Models like this one are used to better understand our complex water systems and help manage them into the future.

Currently, the district is working to develop two additional models for the Trinity River that will simulate river flow and erosion impacts on the river as well as other parameters. (link to end user and tie into growth around the Trinity River?).

Trinity Trail Cyclist | TRWD

Guidance

Minimizing litter and toxins that travel into our reservoirs will help extend the life of the waterbody as well as make it a more enjoyable resource. To manage construction and limit pollution, the district has developed ordinances and rules that must be followed.

Water Quality Guidance ManualWater Quality Guidance Manual

Stormwater

Rain must go somewhere, and it can present challenges with the toxins and litter it pulls into a water supply system. A huge portion of our watersheds contain farms and ranches, so TRWD works diligently in these rural areas to educate landowners about the importance of responsible practices.

Education & OutreachEducation & Outreach

In more populated areas, TRWD works with the City of Fort Worth to implement practices that help control and reduce the amount of pollutants to the river system.

The District has developed a Water Quality Guidance Manual that outlines construction standards for all projects that occur in the floodway. The purpose of this document is to minimize soil runoff during construction as well as establish post-construction standards that will reduce erosion potential.

Water Quality Guidance ManualWater Quality Guidance Manual